Snow Slime

Are your kids caught up in the slime craze, too?  My two oldest, who are 9-1/2 and 8, love playing with slime.  We like to make a new one every few weeks.  For one of their Christmas Advent activities, we created snow slime!  It was so simple to make — only 3 ingredients — and it will last a long time for LOTS of fun, sensory play!  I’m sure this will be a repeat recipe all winter long!

snow slime

Ingredients for Making Snow Slime

Materials:

snow slime

If your kids are into slime making, go ahead and go for the big jugs!  (I linked them in the materials list for your convenience!)

We made two different batches of snow slime (one per kid) — one with the larger faux snow styrofoam balls, and one with the smaller faux snow balls.

snow slime

We found our faux snow at Dollar Tree, but you can also grab both sizes of fake snow in one purchase on Amazon.  You can make your slime using only one size or the other, make one of each like we did, or mix the two sizes of fake snow together in one slime!

How to Make Snow Slime

For each child, put 1/2 cup of white glue into a bowl.  Add in as much fake snow (in either size) as you prefer.  We added just enough for a little texture but not enough to take away from the oozy nature of the slime.  Stir.  Next, add the liquid starch roughly a tablespoon at a time.  Stir and repeat adding starch until the mixture pulls away from the sides of the bowl cleanly and forms a ball.  Then dump this onto a tray or other non-porous surface and start to work the slime with your hands.  I usually let the children do this part, so that my hands are clean to help them add more liquid starch as needed.  If the slime is sticking to their hands and not easily removed, just add more liquid starch.

snow slime

If it becomes too stiff and un-slime-like, then you can add more glue.  When you have it just right, the slime should be very elastic and oozy, but also easy to get off of the tray and your hands.

snow slime

My kids sometimes like to play with it for awhile in the “too slimy” stage because it’s just such ooey gooey messy sticky fun!

snow slime

Your kids may find they like their slime most in the too slimy, just right, or more stiff (like flubber) stages.  Do some experimenting and see which consistency they like best!  You could even turn it into a science experiment!  Feel free to also throw in some science discussion about solids and liquids, weather, or even animal habitats while you’re at it. 😉

snow slime

My kids loved holding the textured snow slime up high in the air — over their tray, of course!! — letting it ooze slowly down.

snow slime

Sometimes it thinned out and made a neat window.

snow slime

I could watch slime ooze all day.  Seriously.

snow slime

There’s something so calming and therapeutic about it… Almost as good as our hush bottles.  Almost.  (See also our snowman hush bottles since we’re talking about calming AND winter!)

snow slime

After doing that for awhile, they decided to grab some animals that might like to play in the snow.  Lilah grabbed penguin toys, and Luke grabbed some Arctic animals.

snow slime

 

snow slime

They played realistically with the animals in the snow for a bit, and then began sliming the animals…because, well, SLIME!  Who needs more reason than that?!?

snow slime

snow slime

It’s fun to watch the kids and see all the ways they play with the slime.

snow slime

Lots of creativity comes out when playing with materials like snow slime!  Have fun watching what your kids come up with!

snow slime

snow slime

Other fun slime recipes:

More winter play and art activities:

Have you made snow slime yet?

snow slime


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